The MGH Report

Michael G. Haran, Proprietor

Something Gained and Something Lost

Posted by on Dec 13, 2014

Commentary 

Healdsburg Tribune

12/11/2014

Along with the dedication of a new park atop of Fitch Mountain a community treasure has quietly slipped into the past. On a sunny Sunday in September, Fitch mountaineers gathered for a potluck at Del Rio beach to share memories of a lake that is no more. Al Pucci, director of the Del Rio Woods Recreation and Park District, Fitch Mountain Association trustee, addressed the group and thanked everyone for their involvement and support. About 30 people came to pay their respects and share stories of their time spent on the Del Rio Woods summer lake.

Del Rio Dam

Del Rio Woods Lake

 The following account of Del Rio Woods was collected by Sylvia Seventy, a longtime resident of Fitch Mountain, and Jane Bonham of the Healdsburg Museum and Historical Society. In 1965 the Healdsburg Tribune reported that “Del Rio Beach is a privately owned beach that the local homeowners’ association makes available to outsiders.” The Del Rio Woods Park and Recreation District was established in 1961 by the Home Owners Association.

 In 1927, two men, (R. Cook and J. Pohley) opened a subdivision named “Del Rio Woods” and several acres near the top of Fitch Mountain were reserved as a public park. Thomas Scoble of San Francisco subsequently bought the project and built a road to the top of the mountain. He then sold off most of the lots that had been reserved for the park. In order to attract summer vacationer he built a dance and band platform, a sales office, a store and a balcony with a “fine view of the river.” In 1937, a dance hall named “Palomar” was built by a new owner (E. Frampton) to replace the open platform.

 In the 1930s Scoble installed a gravel dam. In August of 1933 a lawsuit was filed against Scoble’s Del Rio Properties complaining that the dam was unsafe after it failed three times in several weeks the County asked for a preliminary injunction against maintaining, operating or using a dam across the Russian River at Del Rio Woods.

Del Rio Dam Farewell 9-7-14

 In September 1934, a semi-permanent dam with a permanent spillway was built. It’s kind of curious, but I guess not all that surprising, that the dam, which had passed inspection by the state’s Department of Public Works, was declared unsafe in February of 1935. Work was done in the following summer to strengthen the dam’s wing walls but in 1941 the west wing was washed away by high water.

 In order to avoid the need for annual fund raising from property owners and merchants a permanent recreation district was created and in the 1950s a new permanent spillway was built. The east and west wings of the dam, which consisted of large wooden boards packed in gravel, were built up in the spring and removed in the fall.Del Rio Dam Farewell 9-7-14 022

 The last summer that saw the dam built was in 2002. Concerns about turbidity and mud endangering fish survival and reproduction during the build-up and removal of the wings cause the state and local wildlife authorities to ban the annual dam installation. The permanent spillway was removed this past August.

 The three Daneri sisters, Claire (Harris), Carol (Gerhardt) and Jean (McShane – who came all the way from Florida) told of their summers spent swimming in the lake. They had a summer home on Redwood drive that was built by their father in 1946.

Martha Brooks of Windsor, who was there with her son James, told of meeting her husband Wes in 1963 at a freshman girl’s “all night” party at the lake. For years Wes was in charge of building the dam each summer and, as a helper, it was a summer job for James. She said she was on the crew that would dive down to sandbag the slow erosion around the spillway. Martha told of the “pecking order” on the dam. It seems that the high school boys would perch near the spillway; the middle school boys would sit next to them with the elementary boys being closest to shore. She also said that countless number of kids would consider themselves a “certified swimmer” if they could make it to the lake’s anchored platform and back.

Del Rio Dam Farewell 9-7-14 003

Del Rio Woods Beach Today

Don McEnhill, the Riverkeeper and Executive Director of the Russian Riverkeeper organization was there along with his son Jack. As a young boy Don would play on the lake with his sisters. He said that although the removal of the dam from an historic and sociological standpoint was sad, not having the dam’s annual disturbance is an ecological benefit for the health of the river.

Penelope La Montagne, a long time Fitch Mountain resident who lives on the river and is a poet laureate, used to compose poetry while wading along the lake’s shore. She said that losing the lake was sad and when I asked her for something from one of her “lake” poems she gave me a line from her poem A Five Turtle Day, “With heart-shaped strokes, fingers together, I propel myself the bent cottonwood that signals the shoreline of home.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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THE TRITON BELL

Posted by on Nov 16, 2011

Bob Rawlins is fixture at the Healdsburg Museum. He is one of many invaluable people that devote their time making the museum what it is – one of the best run museums in the California. Bob has been helping out at the museum since 1995.  As a member of the board of directors he is the assistant treasurer, he collects the mail and he is on several committees.   Members of the museum know that Bob is a retired U.S. naval officer but that’s about it. He really doesn’t like to talk about himself so I will.

A couple of months ago I was over at` Jon Lacaillade’s work shop (Jon is the museum’s resident Nantucket master carpenter). He was working on what looked like a piece of furniture. He explained that he was working on a project for Bob Rawlins and then showed me a beautiful navy bell with the inscription USS Triton on it. Remembering my history I knew that the Triton was the United States first nuclear submarine and the first submarine to circumnavigate the globe under water. Jon suggested I write an article about the bell.

I contacted Bob and he told me the history. After graduating from the naval academy at Annapolis, Bob served on two amphibious ships and two destroyers. From 1952 to 1959 he cut his submarine chops on three diesel powered submarines. After nuclear power training Bob skippered two nuclear powered ships and in 1964 became the CO of the Triton.

Bob retired from the navy as a Captain and moved to Healdsburg (smart man). He keeps in touch with his shipmates and they meet annually. When the Triton was decommissioned in 1970 all reusable materials were removed from the ship – the Triton’s bell included.  It was sent to be cut up for scrap but a sailor saved it and sent it to his home in California and later to Nevada.

Through Bob’s shipmate they located the bell and the sailor donated the bell back to the cause. That cause is, after a ship’s reunion in San Francisco in the Spring of 2012, the bell will be sent to the Navy’s Great Lakes Training Station in Chicago. The bell will stand in front of one of the recruit barracks where it will be used in training ceremonies.

We are lucky to have Bob as a member of the Healdsburg Museum. As Holly says, “I don’t know what we would do without him.”

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